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March 8, 2019

Exercise Review: How The Pelvic Floor Effects Athletic Performance

An athlete, by definition, is a person who competes in sports or games that require physical strength. By this definition, I believe every mother has an inner athlete in them.

Help you be your best self

From a young age, I was an athlete at heart, and luckily had a mother who supported my ambition to try nearly every sport possible. From pretending I was Elizabeth Manly in my beginner figure skating class to playing soccer (while practicing my cartwheels on the field) to finally finding my love for competitive swimming. I love physical activity of all types and I will try anything once. I love being part of a team and the social aspect the most.

As an adult, I discovered my love for Crossfit. I loved the workouts and also partially because I loved the social aspect and camaraderie. Though I recognize that this type of activity is not for everyone, it is right for me.

Lets face, say what you want about weightlifting but to be able to get off a couch you have to be able to squat. To lift you kids you have to deadlift (sometimes quite literally if your child is having a meltdown).

Whether you believe you’re an athlete or not, all people have an inner athlete in them, to be a woman, you have super powers (growing a baby and producing food to sustain that baby. Bringing out the inner athlete

I believe that everyone should partake in some form of strength training to support their health and ability to move through activities of daily life. World Health Organization recommends at least two days per week of strength training.

Any activity can be a safe activity if done correctly. It’s when we consistently move without purpose that injury can occur.

Weightlifting and crossfit can have a negative impact on the pelvic floor and overall health if individuals use non-optimal strategies to brace their core and pelvic floor, however they can be excellent exercises types if competed appropriately.

Common concern I hear from Crossfit athletes include: peeing while they skip, pressure in the pelvic floor with lifting, peeing with cycling a barbell, being unable to do box jumps and feeling like their core is weak. The beauty of it, is crossfit is infinitely scalable and there are modifications that can be made while building resilience and progressively overloading the body.

If you apply optimal core bracing strategies, your lifts will get stronger

After a few years of clinical practice, I felt stuck trying to incorporate heavy lifting assessment without access to heavy weights, I decided to move a portion of my practice to the gym so I could work with all athletes of varying age, size, ability achieve optimal strategy

I review current exercises and can help you create a program or focus on activities that you want to introduce or reintroduce. These include weightlifting, high-intensity training, running and crossfit. An exercise review and prescription so you can get the most of your workouts and get back to feeling like yourself!