Lisa Flanders, Registered Physiotherapist

Connecting you with your Pelvic Floor

Category: Prenatal

It’s Not TMI-Episode 4: How Should I Wash My Vulva For Optimal Hygiene?

What if I told you that your vulva and vagina are self-cleaning and that you don’t have to wash with soap? I’ve created a new video below to address vulva care and hygiene. Plus it means another video with my Vulva puppet!

Click on the link below to learn more, and remember, It’s Not TMI!


It’s Not TMI-Episode 3: Does Stopping the Flow of Urine Strengthen Your Pelvic Floor?

I am fortunate enough that I get to do what I love. Right now I am LOVING filming these videos (so much so that I filmed this one at 6 in the morning)!



Episode 3 of “It’s Not TMI” is available. Does stopping the flow of urine strengthen your pelvic floor?

  1. Not everyone needs to strength
    en their pelvic floor (see episode two)
  2. It may increase your risk for urinary tract infections
  3. This action is likely not specific to your dysfunction

Click on the link to find out more. If you have a question that you think is “too much information” feel free to send me a message and I will answer it on an upcoming episode.

It’s Not TMI-Episode 2: All About Kegels

This week on “It’s Not TMI” I am talking all about kegels!

5 reasons kegel exercises may not be appropriate for your pelvic floor.

  1. Kegels are not specific
  2. If you have a tight pelvic floor, doing kegels may make your dysfunction worse
  3. Most women do not do kegels effectively
  4. Kegels are typically not done dynamically or applied to functional exercise
  5. The pelvic floor is only ONE aspect of our deep core (working together with our diaphragm, deep abdominals and low back muscles)

Click on the video link below to learn more about kegels and if they are a good exercise for you.

And yes….I did reference a T-rex, I just watched Jurassic World on Netflix.

Research Study- University of Ottawa

Are you pregnant with your first child? If so, you may be interested in the study below at the University of Ottawa regarding the natural course of recovery of the truck and pelvic floor musculature after delivery.

Research like this is so important to the field of physiotherapy and pelvic health. It allows myself and my colleagues to continue serving our patients with the the most current information and best practices.